PRESS ROOM

Seattle Times journalists awarded ten C. B. Blethen Memorial 2016 awards

For Immediat Release — Nov. 17, 2016
Lindsay Taylor, Consumer Marketing Manager

SEATTLE, Wash. — Yesterday The Seattle Times won ten C. B. Blethen memorial awards, earning recognition in all six categories.

The awards were established in 1977 in honor of C.B. Blethen, publisher of The Seattle Times for 26 years, from 1915 to 1941. The awards, sponsored by The Seattle Times and administered by the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Association, honor reporters from newspapers in two circulation divisions (over 50,000 circulation and under 50,000 circulation).

Seattle Times Assistant Managing Editor of Morning Initiative Ryan Blethen presented the ceremony in a webinar, which you may view here.

The award categories are as follows: distinguished coverage of diversity issues, deadline reporting, enterprise reporting, feature writing, investigative reporting, and consumer affairs coverage.

As in past years, the judges were selected from highly respected newspapers outside the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Times winners were:

DISTINGUISHED COVERAGE OF DIVERSITY

1st place

The Seattle Times staff for their overall series of stories on diversity

The judge wrote:

Very strong collection of stories that looked into diversity from different perspectives.

Reporter Nina Shapiro looked at the Rachel Dolezal vs. race story into a new -- and thought-provoking -- direction. Katherine Long looked at race in college beyond the statistics and interviewed a dozen black students who offered a blunt view of their situation. Shapiro's piece on the transgender bathroom issue offers strong points raised by trans people. Tyrone Beason's use of words – “in a bus overloaded with hate” -- puts the reader in the shoes of black residents in the Central District. Brian Cantwell’s profile is solid, informative and well-written.

3rd place

The Seattle Times for Nina Shapiro’s contributions to a series of stories on diversity

The judge commented:

Awesome works by Nina Shapiro. The subjects and issues are varied, but the common thread is strong reporting with an emphasis on the human side. This is especially true on her story about how a community pulls together to help Syrian refugees in need of a place that is welcoming. The profile of Gabriel Galanda is packed with not just facts, but with tidbits about the Seattle-based lawyer and individuals affected by disenrollment.

 

DEADLINE REPORTING

2nd place

The Seattle Times for “Ride the Ducks crash” by The Seattle Times Staff

The judge wrote:

Great Page 1 play and solid digital storytelling. Excellent photos and video. Interesting interview with the victim in the hospital on the digital side.

 

ENTERPRISE REPORTING

1st place

The Seattle Times for “Unsettled: Immigrants search for their ‘forever’ homes in Seattle”

by Tyrone Beason

The judge said:

(Judge did not comment.)

3rd place

The Seattle Times for “A Season of Drought” by Hal Bernton and Steve Ringman

The judge wrote:

(Judge did not comment.)

FEATURE WRITING

2nd place

The Seattle Times for “‘This has got to change’: Women game developers fight sexism in industry” by Susan Kelleher

The judge wrote:

(Judge did not comment.)

3rd place

The Seattle Times for “‘Seattle’s party people find connections in hidden hot spots” by Tyrone Beason

The judge wrote:

(Judge did not comment.)

INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING

2nd place

The Seattle Times for “Minorities exploited by Warren Buffett's mobile home empire” by Mike Baker of the Seattle Times and Daniel Wagner of BuzzFeed

The judge said:

Tough decision in an especially competitive category. Great reporting with layers of detail; tons of sources and great graphics too. An investigation series to be proud of.

The Debby Lowman Award for Distinguished Reporting for Consumer Affairs

2nd place

The Seattle Times for “Consumer safety in legal marijuana” by Bob Young

The judge said:

This opened my eyes about what we'll see in California

3rd place

The Seattle Times for “War on Cars” by Brier Dudley

The judge said:

(Judge did not comment.)