Local investigative journalism exposes injustice, fights corruption and rights wrongs.

The Seattle Times Investigative Journalism Fund, an initiative with Seattle Foundation, is collaborating with community funders and personal champions of the free press to ensure the future of local investigative journalism and protect and expand the ambitious, rigorously reported work that has a direct impact on our community.

Our goal is to build one of the largest local investigative teams in the nation to increase our ability to engage the public, call for accountability, and explore solutions to make a difference for the people of our region. Join us in supporting this important work.

“Investigative reporting is a time-consuming endeavor. It can take months to piece together a story so that it can withstand scrutiny, be fair to all sides and uncover the things that need to be uncovered to cause some sort of change. The Seattle Times is known around the country as a place that is spending the resources and the time to do investigative reporting and do it well.”

MIKE BAKER
Investigative reporter, The Seattle Times

Help ensure the future of investigative journalism in your local community.

Investigative reporting is the most essential journalism a news staff can do – and the most expensive. Support the Investigative Journalism Fund and protect the future of investigative journalism that has a direct impact on your local community. This first phase of funding will provide one editor, two investigative reporters and research resources.

RAISED PHASE 1 GOAL
$119,500
$500,000
25% 50% 75%

Donations to The Seattle Times Investigative Journalism Fund through Seattle Foundation are tax-deductible to the extent provided by law. No goods or services are received in exchange for donations.

Changing lives and public policy

Seattle Times investigative journalism changes lives and public policy and has resulted in action at the highest levels of government. We have an established track record of digging deep to tackle urgent community issues head-on, surface viable solutions and create change that has a direct impact on our community. Seattle Times investigations have saved local lives from dangerous painkillers, protected vulnerable seniors from abuse, made airplanes safer, exposed double-booked surgeries at a local hospital and expedited FDA changes to help prevent birth defects, to name a few.

The Seattle Times difference

The Seattle Times is proud to be one of the few remaining independent, locally owned news media organizations in the U.S.; the most-visited digital information source in the state and the second-largest newspaper on the West Coast. A trusted local institution since 1896, The Seattle Times remains deeply rooted in public service and committed to serving the Northwest with principled, quality journalism. Rigorously reported, in-depth investigations have helped earn The Seattle Times 10 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization in the Northwest.

To learn more, contact Kristi Waite, director of development, at kwaite@seattletimes.com.

The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over content produced with fund resources. Funders do not have any input into the reporting of stories or into any of the specific content that will be produced with fund resources. Funders are not aware of specific stories The Seattle Times newsroom is working on and do not review them before publication. Funders do not have special access to reporters, and readers know who our funders are.


The Seattle Times Investigative Journalism Fund is a component fund of Seattle Foundation, a Section 501(c)(3) organization. Seattle Foundation has exclusive legal control over all funds received. Accordingly, contributions to the Fund are treated for tax purposes as gifts to a Section 501(c)(3) public charity and are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.